Abbott Arms - Gunsmith

CERAKOTE VS. DURACOAT

What are the big differences – the Pros and Cons?
Why is everyone asking which is better?
Well I can help, as I have had personal experience with both.

DURACOAT

Why choose Duracoat?

Duracoat is a two part, paint and hardener mix. It is very easy to apply, takes no special equipment and is an air cured product. When applied, Duracoat is anywhere from .001 - .008 thick. Duracoat may be applied to all different types of material and in different sheens. Meaning the thicker you spray the shinier it gets. Duracoat is air cured and fully cured after 3-6 weeks.

CERAKOTE

Why choose Cerakote?

Cerakote is a two part, paint and hardener mix in the H-Series and one stage in the C-Series. It has to be applied with a HVLP spray gun and air compressor. Cerakote has several different products: H-Series – oven cured, can withstand temps from 500 – 800 deg.F, fully cured when cool to touch C-Series – air cured, can withstand high temps up to 2,000 deg.F, fully cured after 5 days Also has a special coating for use with piston skirts, combustion chambers, and more applications to help reduce heat and friction.

Cerakote is a ceramic based finish that can be applied to anything you can think of. The H-Series can be applied to anything except rubber and graphite. The C-Series can be applied to anything. Cerakote has been formulated to be abrasion, wear, corrosion, chemical, and impact resistant. Cerakote has become the choice of many manufactures not only for firearms but for exhaust and engine applications and so much more. When applied, Cerakote is anywhere from .0005 - .001 thickness which is a big plus when dealing with very tight and crucial tolerances.

H-Series – oven cured, fully cured when cool to touch

C-Series – air cured, can be handled after 24 hours, and fully cured after 5 days
Now, why I chose Cerakote after using both Cerakote and Duracoat.
Cerakote
Pros –
Oven cured

Impact, abrasion, corrosion, wear and chemical resistant

When cured you can clean it with acetone

Won’t flake or chip

Outperforming hardness

Easy to use with stencils

Can be applied to any kind of material

Cures quickly

State of the art performance in the lab and real world

Applies smoothly and evenly

Cons –
Have yet to find any
Duracoat
Pros –
Easy to apply

Air cured

Cons –
Not abrasion, chemical, impact or corrosion resistant

Chips and flakes fairly easily

When using stencils sometimes the adhesion pulls the previous coating off

Takes 3-6 weeks to fully cure

Have to be careful what you use to clean with

Occasionally does not have a smooth finish

Too thick when tolerances count

Have to keep applying to get a certain sheen

PERSONAL EXPERIENCE WITH TESTING THE TWO COATINGS I SPRAYED AN AR-15 BOLT CARRIER
ONE WEEK AFTER SPRAYING I PUT THE TEST PIECES IN A 100% ACETONE BATH FOR ONE COMPLETE WEEK
I NOTICED AFTER TWO DAYS THE DURACOAT HAD STARTED TO LET GO OF THE PRODUCT
AFTER THE WEEK WAS UP I REMOVED THEM FROM THE BATH AND WIPED THEM WITH AN EMORY CLOTH
THE DURACOAT WIPED OFF CLEAN
THE CERAKOTE DID NOT EVEN SCRATCH



In the end, when I started applying Cerakote, I threw all the Duracoat away.